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Join the community of organizations who have built their leaders, teams, employees with FOCUS tools. 

Join the community of organizations who have built their leaders, teams, employees with FOCUS tools. 

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5 Behaviors of a Cohesive Team

5 Behaviors of a

Cohesive Team

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ has a simple goal: To facilitate a learning experience that helps professionals and their organizations discover what it takes to build a truly cohesive and effective team. The Five Behaviors™ profile, which provides both individual and team feedback, is grounded in the model described in The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, the internationally best-selling leadership book by Patrick Lencioni. With this program, participants will learn how, as a team, they score on the key components of the model: Trust, Conflict, Commitment, Accountability, and Results. Additionally, the program is powered by Everything DiSC®, personality models that help individuals understand themselves and others better. Using these results, participants will be able to create a better, stronger team.

The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team assessment and workshop is designed for an existing, intact team who is experiencing some challenges. Before choosing this program, consider these questions:

Is this a NEW team?

 

We believe the first few weeks of a team’s life together are of critical importance. If this is a newly established team that is in its forming stage, our Team Launch program is a better solution for you. 

 

 

Is the team really a TEAM?

 

A team is a relatively small number of people (from three to twelve) who meet on a regular basis and are collectively responsible for results. Team members share a common purpose and goals, as well as the rewards and responsibilities for achieving them.

 

Who will NOT benefit from this process?

Not every group is a team. For example, a group that appears to be a team might simply be a collection of people who report to the same manager, but who have relatively little interdependence and mutual accountability. If a group does not meet the criteria of a true team, this process is unlikely to produce the results they expect.

Who will benefit from this process?